Trunk Club & The Case for Convenience Over Price

Full disclosure: This post is not sponsored/promoted by Trunk Club in any way. However, links to their site do contain a referral code. If you click on these links and sign up, you will be referred to my stylist and I will receive a $50 credit when you spend $50 or more. If you’re interested in signing up but do not want to participate in that referral program, I still recommend you work with my stylist. You can just that by visiting this link.


 

There are a lot of reviews out there for Trunk Club, along with virtually every clothing subscription service out there. Believe me, I read a lot of them before deciding to sign up. The big trouble I’ve had, which I’m attempting to improve upon here, is two things. One, every review I found involved the reviewer not continuing with the service or even keeping one item. Not out of dissatisfaction necessarily, but because they just wanted to write a review. Two, many are written by fashion bloggers. In my case, I needed help with fashion and happen to be a blogger, but this lengthy post was something I decided to do after signing up, not as the impetus to signing up. Continue reading “Trunk Club & The Case for Convenience Over Price”

More Self-Serving Social Media Marketing

social media marketing fail

The above image is the featured part of an email I received from a regional chain of hardware stores.  First off, not a prime candidate for an exciting social media campaign, but there’s always hope they can make it work.  My hopes were low when I saw the subject line “Let’s get social!”.

But fine, they want to promote their Facebook page, that’s cool.  What’s in it for me?

Oh, I get to explain how much I love your company?  I get to give you ideas about how you can make more money off of me?  I can alert you whenever I’m in your store so you know just how valuable of a customer I am?

Sounds great, where do I sign up!

About the only thing they got right here, is they seem to understand that their social channels are for existing customers – not awareness building.  But seriously, you expect the customer to opt in to even more of your marketing, at least throw them a bone.  Say their might be social-only coupons or sales.  Or maybe promise to randomly post how-to guides, since people come to your stores to buy supplies for major projects.  Hell, gardening tips would be a step in the right direction.

The funny thing is, what they promise here is exactly what the vast majority of social media campaigns deliver.  This company just happens to be up front about it.  Maybe that’s a positive?  At least I know right away that I don’t have to waste my time.

Some neat Google Analytics tricks

find it at http://blog.jayratkowski.com

One of my favorite sites for the do-it-yourselfer, SEOmoz, had a handy blog post about getting some more usefulness out of Google Analytics. GA is famous for providing a boatload of data with no obvious way to understand what it’s saying; so tricks like these help get some real useful info out of your data. A very useful tip for someone running their own website is step 2 in this article.

2) Check Your Analytics Code Is Correctly Installed
This is a super easy one, but definitely one worth running on any new site you take a look at. SiteScan will crawl your site and check for the analytics code which is pretty nifty. It even intelligently checks for the old and new versions of the GA code. Nice. Unfortunately the free version only checks 100 pages but it’s definitely a solid resource for smaller sites:

Another quick check for correctly installed Google Analytics is to look for referrals from your own domain. Any referral from your own domain indicates that there are pages not correctly tagged (and will even show you which ones!). Nice.

Especially when you’re using a content management system or have started hacking your site and modifying the original design, it’s great to do checkups like this to see if some of the pages you’ve added aren’t being tracked.
One of my favorite sites for the do-it-yourselfer, SEOmoz, had a handy blog post about getting some more usefulness out of Google Analytics. GA is famous for providing a boatload of data with no obvious way to understand what it’s saying; so tricks like these help get some real useful info out of your data. A very useful tip for someone running their own website is step 2 in this article.

2) Check Your Analytics Code Is Correctly InstalledThis is a super easy one, but definitely one worth running on any new site you take a look at. SiteScan will crawl your site and check for the analytics code which is pretty nifty. It even intelligently checks for the old and new versions of the GA code. Nice. Unfortunately the free version only checks 100 pages but it’s definitely a solid resource for smaller sites:

Another quick check for correctly installed Google Analytics is to look for referrals from your own domain. Any referral from your own domain indicates that there are pages not correctly tagged (and will even show you which ones!). Nice.

Especially when you’re using a content management system or have started hacking your site and modifying the original design, it’s great to do checkups like this to see if some of the pages you’ve added aren’t being tracked.

People in Google, Kansas are searching with Topeka

The search engine Google, paying homage to the city Topeka, which changed its name to Google, is now called Topeka (at least for today).

The search engine Google, paying homage to the city Topeka, which changed its name to Google, is now called Topeka (at least for today).  The Official Google Topeka Blog has an amusing write-up about everything.  Not sure it was their intention, but it kind of mocks the move made by the city Topeka.  Funny stuff regardless.  They claim this has no bearing on their broadband decision, but I’m sure people living in Google are very hopeful.

Facebook for iPhone Friend Sync: Should we be worried?

In the last release of the Facebook app for the iPhone (V 3.1) a new feature was added under the “Friends” tab, allowing you to sync your iPhone contacts with your Facebook contacts.  The biggest impact is that when a friend appears on Facebook as well as in your phone contacts, their photo will be downloaded from Facebook and used with the contact profile.  The sync will also add a link to facebook profiles in your contacts.  This is nothing that couldn’t be handled with a 3rd party application in the past, but now it’s integrated into Facebook.  If someone is your friend on Facebook but not in your contacts, a contact will not be created.

Pretty handy feature, until you go to activate it.  We’ve all heard cautionary tales of Facebook and their privacy policies in the past, so it was a little alarming when the following message popped up:

IMG_0870

“If you enable this feature, contacts from your device will be sent to Facebook and your friends’ names, photos, and other info from Facebook will be added to your iPhone address book.  Please make sure your friends are comfortable with any use you make of their information.”

That’s kind of an ominous TOS statement.  What happens to my contacts once they’re sent to Facebook?  What do they mean by “make sure your friends are comfortable with any use you make of their information?”  Does that mean I’m giving Facebook and its advertising partners full access to phone numbers and e-mail addresses stored in my phone?  Facebook has pulled off some really unethical moves like that in the past, so it wouldn’t surprise me.  It will be very interesting to see if anything comes of this.

WTF is wrong with the EC? Microsoft antitrust talk again

So the EC is laying antitrust charges on Microsoft for bundling IE and Windows.  They claim this is hurting competition in the web browser market.  Seriously?  Why do you suppose this is?  Is it because IE is a superior browser?  Is it because Microsoft denies people the ability to switch?  Is it because most people have little or no clue competition exists?  I think the last item is closest to the truth.  With that assumption in mind, if Microsoft packaged Windows with no web browser, what would people do?  Would they have to figure out how to download a browser without having an existing platform to work from?  My guess is that IE would be the easiest one to attain without having a browser at all.  As far as I know, you can’t just go to the store and buy a Firefox CD.  Maybe you can, but why would you when you can get it for free online?

If we ignore the complications of people finding and installing their own browser, what other option is there?  Should Microsoft be forced to sell Windows with 3rd party browsers installed?  If so, why should they be required to support the competion?

This is just another example of the EU trying to punish big business from outside their borders.  It’s also a case of policymakers not really understanding the problems they are trying to regulate.  I’m not a Microsoft fanboy, but I will definitely support them in this case.  This is just foolish use of government.  Businesses (including MSFT) are hurting enough, they don’t need big brother cracking the whip for needless regulation.